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Anarcat: Calibre replacement considerations

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Article:

(published: Oct. 6, 2019, 7:27 p.m.)

Summary

TL;DR: I'm considering replacing those various Calibre compnents with...

See below why and a deeper discussion on all the features.

Problems with Calibre

Calibre is an amazing software: it allows users to manage ebooks on your desktop and a multitude of ebook readers. It's used by Linux geeks as well as Windows power-users and vastly surpasses any native app shipped by ebook manufacturers. I know almost exactly zero people that have an ebook reader that do not use Calibre.

However, it has had many problems over the years:

Update: a previous version of that post claimed that all of Calibre had been removed from Debian. This was inaccurate, as the Debian Calibre maintainer pointed out. What happened was Calibre 4.0 was uploaded to Debian unstable, then broke because of missing Python 2 dependencies, and an older version (3.48) was uploaded in its place. So Calibre will stay around in Debian for the foreseeable future, hopefully, but the current latest version (4.0) cannot get in because it depends on older Python 2 libraries.

The latest issue (Python 3) is the last straw, for me. While Calibe is an awesome piece of software, I can't help but think it's doing too much, and the wrong way. It's one of those tools that looks amazing on the surface, but when you look underneath, it's a monster that is impossible to maintain, a liability that is just bound to cause more problems in the future.

What does Calibre do anyways

So let's say I wanted to get rid of Calibre, what would that mean exactly? What do I actually use Calibre for anyways?

Calibre is...

Note that I might have forgotten functionality in Calibre in the above list: I'm only listing the things I have used or am using on a regular basis. For example, you can have a USB stick with Calibre on it to carry the actual software, along with the book library, around on different computers, but I never used that feature.

So there you go. It's a colossal task! And while it's great that Calibre does all those things, I can't help but think that it would be better if Calibre was split up in multiple components, each maintained separately. I would love to use only the document converter, for example. It's possible to do that on the commandline, but it still means I have the entire Calibre package installed.

Maybe a simple solution, from Debian's point of view, would be to split the package into multiple components, with the GUI and web servers packaged separately from the commandline converter. This way I would be able to install only the parts of Calibre I need and have limited exposure to other security issues. It would also make it easier to run Calibre headless, in a virtual machine or remote server for extra isoluation, for example.

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